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Full text of "Wellesley news"

College 1Re\x>8. 



Vol. 7. No. 22. 



WELLESLEY, MASS., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18. 190%. 



Price, 5 Cents. 



Athletic Association Meeting. 

,\ meeting of the Athletic Assoi iation 
was held in College Hall Chapel on Friday, 
March 13, The proposed new con ititu 

lien was read. Miss Curtis, as 1 hi an 

of the Constitution Committee, told ol the 
history of the drawing up of the new con- 
stitution. For two years the At ation 

has been seeking to frame a constitution 
satisfactory to both the members of the 
Association and the Faculty. The consti- 
tution as read was accepted by the Asso- 
ciation, and will be presented to the Pac 
ulty for approval, in order that it may 
become yalid. Miss Taylor spolce of the 
necessity of keeping in training while in 
any sport, and Miss Curtis urged the girls 
to consider plans for decorating the small 
boats 011 Float, night. Miss Hill spoke of 
the new playground where We may all go 
informally and learn to play and dance 
so that our May Day may really become 
our Play Day. 



" Le Monde ou Ton s' Ennuie." 

L'alliance franchise a donne au Barn, 
lundi soir, neuf mars, une de ses repre- 
sentations publiques, malheureusement 
trop rares. Elle a represent^, en franeais. 
"Le Monde oil Ton s'Ennuie," conn-die 
d' Edouard Paillcron, bien connue en 
France, act uellemciit au repertoire de la 
Conn-die Franchise de Paris. 

L'execution de la piece a de'passe' en 
excellence les representations ordinaires du 
Barn. La mise en scene du dernier acte 
mcrite une mention particuliere, ear il est 
tres difficile de nepresenter une serre, et, 
part iculierement. un jet d'eau. Les jeunes 
fillcs, qui etaient chargies du decor, s'en 
sont admirahlement tire et out recti, lundi 
soir, au lever du rideau, des applaudisse- 
ments eordiaux bien meritcs. 

Le suce s de la soiree a ete pour Mile. 
Suzanne de Villiers, type de la jeune fille 
naive, franche, rebelle a toutes les con- 
ventions mondaines. Mile. Straine a 
montre. dans ee role, une connaissancc de 
Part de la comedie qu 'on n'avait pas vue 
au Barn depuis longtemps. L'aisance et 
la vivacitc de sa premiere entree, la verve 
et le naturel de sou aventure en ehemin de 
fer, ont ete peut-gtre les incidents les plus 
amusants de la com€die. I. "accent si 
puret la diction si parfaite de Mile. Straine 
ont ajoute un charme de plus au person- 
aage qu'elle a representc. 

Mile. Tilford, Roger de Ceran. 1'am- 
oureux gauche et embarresse", Mile Ev- 
erett, la Comtesse de Ceran, type de 
la femme du monde anibitieuse, 



montn u 

rpr il faut louer, 

Even 

elli I' 

1., rdli di r I id 

a etd ad emenl tenu par NT! i- 

dont les .0, 

I, 1 1 1' ivenaii 

personnage qu' elle r< presentait. 

Mile. Straine Mile. Semler et Mile. 
Everett se sot, fail remarquer par un 
accent absolument franeais. une tres 
grande familiarity avec la langu. 
connaissaw 1 parfaiti di leui 

ne peui pas en dire autant de Bellae et de 
Roger de I - ran qui ont nui a leur jeu ex- 
.cll.nl par leur accent legcrcment ameri- 
cain et une connaissance incomplete de 
leurs r les. 

Le role de la vieille duchesse. languis- 
sante, mais perspicace, role execute par 
Mile. Cooper, a etc rendu it 
quoique incompletement. Elle n'a pas 
pris assez de plaisir aux entretiens des 
jeunes gens et n' a pas suffisamment ex 
prime la jeunessc de son ante. 

Mile. Aldrich et Mile. Hollet. "les 

\. .... 1 u-mants. 

Le plaisir qu' ils cprousaient a se trouver 
rcttnis, leurs entretiens a la derobee, leurs 
eommentaires satiriques des habitues du 
Salon de Madame de Ceran. ont 6t6 une 
diversion agreable 

Les personnages secondaires, d'unc tenue 
parfaite. et d'une elegance rare dans le 
choix des costumes, ont produit la meil- 
leure impression. 

II est facile de reconnaitre, dans les 
moindres details le gout artistique de 
Mile. Carret et de Mr. Giraudoux — L'au- 
ditoire leur exprime les remerciements 
empresses que les aeteurs leur ont temoigne 
apres la representation. 

Les personages etaient: 

Bellae Dorothea Lockw 

Roger de Ceran Ella Tilford. '08 

Paul Raymond Evelyn Aldrich, 'og 

Toulonniere Madeline Piper, 'og 

Francois Helen Hall. '00 

La Duchesse de Reville. Helen Cooper. 'oS 

Mine, de Loudan Ruth Hani 

Jeanne Raymond Eloise He 

Lucy Watson Frida Semler. 'cS 

Suzanne de Villiers. Dorothy Straine. '11 
la Comtesse de Ceran. Marion Everett. '10 

Mme. Arriego Ella Symonds. '10 

Mme. de Saint Reaulf. 

Nathalie Lvdecker. 'oS 



I 



com pa rati 

In Germany. Franc 









England f 



ion*, ao 



WELFARE \YORK, 

On Monday evening. March 0. il 
Hall Chapel, those students interested in 
Botany arid Economics enjoyed a lecture 
given by Mr. Nazro on "Welfare Work." 

The lecture was made .'. 

bv lantern slides. The lecturer was 



important in thi 

the establishme: 

Rest and 

Fields. Educational ; roNemj 

like. 

The great necessity for thi^ 
-ises from tic 
greater the number of men cm; 
larger the number of economic proWeim. 
which present themselves. Where there 
are three thousand men empl 
single mill, the he nfronted liieraUy 

with the care of the whole community 
If we entirelv regard the humane side of 
the question. Mr ! us again 

and again 

keep their busi" 
their emplovees the op] - 
themselves.' and their conditK - 
home— that gres" 

Mr Nazro gave us some esf- 
teresting slides, portray.- _ 
as they existed in a mill town :•• 
after the welfare work 
To be sure the 

• -resque than those ir. 
but the difference a bit 
vines and a little shrubbery ma 

couragemo- 

rightlv. too. the fact thai 

feature in 1 

which the 

the proper kinds of tf". 

ployees are only too g", a '• 

__ 
each with a private 
houses of ; 
three dollars and a halt 

every year 
Dav On 
culmination of th 

g 
hibited the agricultural pr 
■ 

is well. Prizes 
the best flower gar 

as w-ell as 

s 

-- 



COL I- E G E N B W S 



College IRewe, 



tNOftCV 4 Co.. Boston. 



corTStpondenoa ihould baaddrataod to 

i .rrar. UuninvM Mannsar CoLLcac Nkwh 
Ml »ul.-rri|jli..iir 1 ithollUl lie iwnt t.i Mi I 
UoCuTDll. 



EDiroR-iN-Cmer. Agnen E. Rotliery. 1000 

Associate Editok, H.-i»ii- K.ikey, 1000 

l-i ri KAKV KniroRs, 

Marion E. Markley. 1000 Mary Lewis. 1000 

Emma L. Hawkridgc. 

\i !■■.!■. i Editor. 

Caroline Fletcher. 

M«N'A<SINI1 ICr.lTOHB. 

Emma McCarroIl, 1808 Anna Brown. 1000 

Alice Fnrrnr. 



"Entered aa asoond clan.* mutter. November V. 
[908. m the Poel Office, al Wellealey, Maaa., umli 

[he Act of Congress. Mnrch .'I. 1S70." 



EDITORIAL. 

For .i long weary year we have untir- 
ingly given beauty hints to Aim i M iti i 
Zealously have we broughl to her notice 
the virtues of lotions and complexion 
creams; and so busy have we been in such 
well doing that we have not had time to 
mention the brightness of her eyes. 

To tell the truth Alma Mater has shown 
a very beautiful spirit under all our carp- 
ing, a good-natured recognition of the 
value of honest criticism. But now as our 
time draws near and we think back over 
all our official utterances our conscience 
unites us a little With all her imper- 
ii !< : ti m i V\ ejle lej is as i fl her colleges, 

and we think it would not be vainglorious 
in this, almost our last editorial, to men 
lion a fc* of her — of our — virtues. 

Not long ago a lecturer said thai he did 
like to come here because we have such a 
nice sense of humor. We are ready at al 
most any moment to break out into 
Spontaneous chuckling. Really a sense 
of humor is a wonderful tiling to have and 
1 eep li lendsa spice to living; it makes 
friends; it is a most excellent vanity reg- 
ulator. 

And yet, though humorous, we think we 
can honestly affirm that We are not frivo- 
lous. There are many things that we 
take very seriously indeed. Wc are loyal 
to Student Government to a man, and our 
Christian Association in all its branches is 
a live force. Our academic work — well, 
as individuals, we would rather not talk 
much about it — but we are rather proud 
of some of the work done here, and we are 



DR. CHAS. E. TAYLOR 
DENTIST 

Taylor Block, Wellesley, Mass. 

Oflice Hours. 9-5 Telephone Connection 

Woman's Medical College, 

of Pennsylvania. 

hltyeithlh Annul S*»ion. Ihoinitn Coniw four |fU1 l«rp!ioul 
Nulilin l»i Nooulolt Mi Mi* Instiu.lion fosl-liMdnilr (oarvl in Op- 
mint (i)M«olotl. in Mrlrm. (he lye. Ul. Now J ml IhfMl loll (Wli'U 
Ult il (ilafnur 

Clara Marshall, M.D., Dean, 

Bo i 900 21a SI. iio North Colin' Alt. rbiuitlpkii. Pj 

THE FISK TEACHERS* AGENCIES, 

EVERETT O. fISK & CO., Proprietors. 

Ashburton PI., Boston, Mass. 

156 Fifth Ave, New York, N.Y. 

1505 Pcnn. Ave., Washington, D.C. 
203 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 



Rookery lll.nk. Sp.1k.1nc, Wash. 

1,210 Williams Ave., Portland, Ore. 
.15 Studio Building, Berkeley, Cal. 

238 Douglas Building, Los Aigeles, Cal. 

Send lo any ot Ihr dome dddimn (or Agency Manual and Regulation form. 



rather proud of our average — and our 
health is simply phenomenal, which speaks 
much for sane living. 

Perhaps we are a bit exclusive, a bit 
to things of the outside world 
which is not Wellesley, but we warmly 
welcome the stranger within our gates. 
And we arc not snobbish. We do not 
choose our friends from mercenary mo- 
tives, but like them bei a use we like them, 
becausi < he.) are the kind of people we 
like. Ami everybody has an equal chance 
to be amiable and generous. 

Above everything else we stick together 
strongly. When we once belong lo 
Wellesley We always belong to Wellesley. 

The Alumnae come back with the same 
zest as students. We are all for Wellesley. 
It is not mere vapid enthusiasm, but a big, 
true spirit that makes us cheer till we out- 
croak the frogs, and sing, 

" We love our Wellesley fair and free. 
Our College Beautiful. 




41 

Summer St. 
BOSTON. 



Our Novelties in 

JEWELRY 

Appeal to People of Refined Tastes 



NO GOODS BUT GOOD GOODS 
AT ANY PRICE 




WELLESLEY COLLEGE 
SEAL PINS 
AND CHARMS, 

Two sizes, Gray silver 
and Rose gold, $i.3Si 
Si. 50, $2.00 and $2.50. 

Silk fobs to match. 

OPTICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Glasses made to order and repaired. 

If you haven't prescription, send glasses. 
We duplicate broken lenses promptly. 
Copy formula, and place on file for future 
reference. Mail orders promptly filled. 



Two Miles from College. 



Phone 124-5 



H lewelers'and Opticians,'Natick, Mass. 

868 IS|L. E. COLE. Mgr. 



I path and tree 
uliful 
1 

and lo 

' rue, 
1 of all 
All hail to the Weill 



A 

Scallop Shell 
of Quiet 

Caroline Hazard 

President oj Wellesley College, author 0/ 

■■ v.o , ' . te. 

THIS little book contains forty Lenten 
Sonnets, an Interlude of fifteen 
poems, and eight final sonnets. 
funning a Cycle of (irief over the death 
of a friend. All the sonnets are pro- 
foundly religious in .spirit and marked 
by line feeling. The Lenten Sonnets 
begin with Ash-Wednesday, and follow 
the penitential season, ending with a 
sonnet for each day of Passion Week, 
and one for Kastsr Day. 

WITH PBONTISPIECB 11.I.1STKATIOX 

CROWN SVO. SI. 00 XKT 

POSTAGI 10 ei S 1 - 

For salt at all booksellers 
HOUGHTON, MIFFLIN & CO. 



SAVES HOSIERY 



NEVER SLIPS, TEARS 
NOR UNFASTENS 

Every Pair 

Warranted 

The 




HOSE 
SUPPORTER 



OEORCE FROST CO., Mi 



COL L E G B N 



COLLEGE CALENDAR. 



Wednesday, Man h 18, | io P M., Mi morial i 

i irgan Rei ital b U Profi i 

I I,,, i d i Man h 19, 7.3 P.M., 1 olli ■■ H Ch 

I Inc. I i.'lli A .i" 1. I' ..'I' 1 . Ml Kr-II.IlM 1 . 

Friday, March 20, 8 I'M, 1 oil ge Hal pel 

fane Addams ol Hull H Chii ago 

Saturday . Man h ■ 1 . 7. io P M , the B 

i ( [i A M . ei i' es in 1 (ought on Memorial 

er, Rev, Elw I Won 1 ter otBosti 

Special mu ii 

p 1 1 olli gi Hall 1 el re< ital of 
1.1 1 . bj I ii Hi rmann 



Sunday, M 

lei 

7 P M 

Monday, M 
Moden 
Hanov 

Tuesday 



14,4.15 P.M., Billing Hall itudi 
Wednesday, March ■ -,. 1 • P.M., Memorial ' 

, u ,,,,1, rei ital b) Profi isoi I tammond ol Ml H 
1 ollege 

COLLEGE NOTES. 



1 in Friday, March 21 1, Miss Jane Addams of Hull H 1 
Chicago, whose wor! is :o well known among all thosi ii 
in Settlement Work, will speak in Collegi Hall 1 hapi 
Miss Addams is here undei 1 he au pii es 1 il The 1 olli gi 1 

On Tuesday evening, March ro, the Scribblei 
Z, E. House Miss Josephine Bowden '08 read. 

The iv.Mil:ir iiK-i-1 iii". "i ih, S. ., \.i I Study Club was held in the 

Faculty Parlor on Tue da; e 1 Man h : 1 ' 

informal di ii us lion was Socialism." [nten 
were asked which Miss Balch and Mi nswered. 

Everyone went away with a cleat idea ol ocialism nol as a 
mere ideal bu1 as a practical useful working method of bene- 

Once mon le1 us remind the college "1 t he El n Depart- 

nii'iii Recitals mentioned in the News ol March | , I be given 
soon after Easter vacation Julia Marlowe says of Mrs, Marion 
Craig Wentworth, Le1 me lay I did nol half express what I 
fell about vmii' re.elme, ■ ■!' The Sunken Bell.' I enjoyed every 
moment of it beeausi von were so illuminated and illun 
to the text. You have found the secret of it all." 

sday afternoons. March iS and tq, 
Hathaway of the Fiske Agency of 



rowning Room to interview students 



On Wednesday am 

from 2 to 5.20 P.M., 
Boston will be in the 
tending to teach. 

Tickets for the performance of "Bartholomew Fair." the 
Elizabethian pla} given by the Harvard Chapter of Delta 
Upsilon in the "Barn" on April 11. can be obtained of W. L. 
Stevens, Weld 8, Cambridge. They will be on sale at the 
Elevator Table in College Hall a day or two before the vacation 
and also on the 9, 10, "and 11 of April. The prices are Si. 00 
75 cents and 50 cents. 

To those interested in the birds and flowers of YVellesley. 
notices of the arrival of birds and the blossoming of flowers .and 
menrion of those expected as the spring progresses, may be a 
pleasure. 

BIRDS. 

Permanent residents seen at Wellesley. 
Bob While 
Ruffled Grouse 
Red Shoulered Hawk 
Screech I >w 1 
Hairy Woodpecker 
Downy Woodpecker 
Flicker 



Malli 

1 
Wild I • 

* TO 

Dan-i' 
Chi. ;. 

Snow 




FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND HOTHOUSE PRODUCTS. 

SPECIAl ATTENTION GI VEN TO HOT EL ClfB AHD fAMILV CWttL 
ISAAC LOCKE ®. CO., 

97, 99 and IOI Faneuil Hall MarKet. 

STURTEVANT & HALEY, 
BEER AND SUPPLY CO. 

38 and 40 Faneuil Hall MarKet, 
BOSTON. 

Telephone 933 Richmond. hotel scpn-riie » sficiaxtt 

Preferred Stock High Grade Coffee 

Always Uniform and Delicious in Flavor. 

MARTIN L. HALL ,5c CO., BOSTON 



L. P. HOLLANDER & CO. 

Our Complete Assortment of Spring and Summer 

SilDss sum-d. HD^ress G-oocLs 

are now on exhibition. 
Also a late arrival of Cotton and Linen Wash Fabrics. 

202 to 216 BOYLSTON STREET. BOSTON. 



COL h E G E N E W S 



d t Wigs 



Wigs, Beards, Etc., to Hire for Amateur Theatricals and all Stage 
Productions. Grease Paints, Powders, Burnt Cork, Rouge , 1 i> ■ 

1V\. O. 8L.ATTERY, 

aj6 Treraont Street, Boston, Theati 

BatWMO BUol Ud I.aGrange Sti. 
Opp. Majestic Theater 

Hair Work of Every Description. 
Special Attention Given to Order Work. 

Home-Made Bread and Rolls, a variety of 
Calces, Pies and Doughnuts, also Confectionery 

AT THE 

WELLESLEY FOOD SALESROOM, 

54-1 Washington Street, Wellesley, Mass. 

NOTICE:— Mr. Odin Fritz herewith wishes to thank the Class 
of iqo8 for the honor and pleasure in voting him :qo8 class photo- 
grapher. Taking this opportunity to further impress it upon the 
Students desiring photographs to make appointments for sittings 
as early as possible to insure better attention and absolutely 
satisfactory work otherwise sometimes slighted on account of 
time limit. Other classes are afforded the same rates and most 
cordially invited. Respectfully, ODIN FRITZ. 



LATER ROMAN PAGANISM. 



Professor Clifford Kerschel Moore of Harvard delivered an 
interesting lecture, Wednesday, March ti, in College Hall 
Chapel. His subject was, "Some Characteristics of Lain- Ro- 
man Paganism." Professor Moore spoke tirst of the general 
hnk of Study and of knowledge of Roman conditions during the 
thud and fourth centuries, and of the great change taking place 
before and during this period in Roman religion. He spoke of 
the period of indifference to religious forms and thought . of re- 
ligious decay- during the early empire and named Virgil with 
his literary gods and Horace, the frank atheist, as examples ol 
this period. Augustus' attempt to revive the ancienl cult did 
not dclav the inevitable decay The cult of the Emperor was es- 
tablished at this time. 

The first three centuries of our era saw great changes in the 
religion. The official religion was not given up; Jupiter was 
still supreme. But countless other gods were introduced by 
various means. Society at Rome became very cosmopolitan. 
Contact with other and older civilizations through foreign cam- 
paigns and trade established many strange, mysterious oriental 
cults at Rome, such as the worship of the Great Mother of 
Phrygia, of Isis of Egypt and of Milterus from Persia. The 
practical exact performance of ritual could not satisfy the 
"sense of sin," as this new kind of worship with its attendant 
nxysti i UN, secret elaborate ritual and initiations. Each of these 
hew Divinities claimed to be the supreme, all-comprehending 
god 

Professor Moore called the age one of reaction from the period 
of indilTerentism of the first century B C. Religion ceased to be 
national and became individualistic, as socitey grew more cos- 
mopolitan. With the republic, political life had practically 
ceased and men's thoughts turned naturally toward other 
things. Professor Moore spoke next of the influence of Stoi- 
cism and of Nfeoplatonism. 

The former was a strong, moral philosophy with a pantheistic 
conception. Cod was a single principle, but demons were recog- 
nized in an intermediate world between God and man The 

doiiiinanl Hole of this philosophy was one of sadness. The su- 
preme deity was an abstraction. The fate of the individual 
sou! was annihilation, It was too pessimistic to satisfy men's 

Neopli ism was a new Alexandrian philosophy, li was an 

abstract monotheism which recognized beings between man and 
the divinity, emanations from the supreme, steps by which man 

could approach di\ mil v. 

In do ing, I'rufi oi Moore told how paganism prepares 
the way for Christianity. Its essential features, he said, are 

first: safety hereafter; second: satisfaction now bv various I civ 

monies, baptism, reception into the church, ritual, promise of 

the future. Profe or M v compared some of these symbolic 

ceremonies with similar pagan rites in the cull of Isis or the 
Orphic sect. The way for Christianity, was 10 prepared by 
paganism that Christianity appeared as a new Eastern mvsteiw 
ami as such did not seem itrangeand antagonizing toone. In 
conclusion, Professor Moor,- reminded us thai no change is 
udden and thai Christianity owes a great debt to paganism Eor 
preparing her way. 



MISS G. L. LEWIS, 
PICTURE FRAMER, 

SIS Pkni Buitdin?. fopk, Squirt. BnlM, Uwtifl. [ies4iyi fi Iviifi. 9 U S. 

Colored Photographs of Ihe College on sale al the College Bookstore. 

HOTEL NOTTINGHAM, 

Copley Square, Boston 

Three minutes' walk from Trinity Place and Huntington 
Avenue Stations of the B. & A. R. R. 

Electric Cars pass Its doors going to all Railroad Sta- 
tions, Steamboat Wharves, Theatres and the shop- 
ping district. 
European Plan. Cuisine of the best. 

FRANCIS HOWE, Manager. 

CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 



from th 
most stt 

and is. i 



lava si 



,\ short business meeting was held at 7.20 P.M., at which Miss 
Fuller gavi a mi sagi from the National Board through Miss 
Brooks, to Mi. effei 1 that our delegation to Silver Bay must be 
limited to ten members. The reason for this change "lies in the 
fact that the delegations from the smaller colleges, which be- 
long to the board, are apt to be overlooked, and attention di- 
rected lo the large and enthusiastic delegations from Wellesley, 
Smith and Vassar. which arc not yet affiliated. The Silver Bay 
Committee will now be called the Summer Conference Commit- 
tee and the ten delegates will be chosen with the greatest care. 
The business meeting was then adjourned. 

M,-- s. udder, after reading a prayer written bv St. Augustine. 
announced as her text: "Thou shall love the Lord thy God, 

She spoke first of the apparent antithesis evident on consid- 
ering the relation of the intellectual to thi r ligious life, arising 
hat the glory of the Christian life is open to the 
well as to sages; that it is revealed unto babes, 
ce, indepei di ol the wisdom of this world. 
the text, there is this great command to bring 
• to obedience to Christ, in whom are hid all the 
idom and knowledge. By obeying this we may 
nil as power in religious life. Two consequences 
arise from failure to unite the religious life with the intel- 
lectual. First, the church is too remote from the greater in- 
tellectual movements of the times. Second, there is a general 
shrinking of the religious minded from dogma. Everyone must 
think in dogma-, for a religion of feeling alone could not endure. 
Religion should be the a. ti'vitv of the whole nature raised to the 
highest power, for this we should clarify our minds and let them 
work at the great systems of truth, of which creeds are the 
symbols. . , 

"The intellect taken bv itself cannot find God; the quest is 
gained as a result of the interplay of till the powers— imagina- 
tion, emotion and will entering very largely into the search. 
When God is once experienced bv the soul, the intellect is re- 
created, it is transfigured and exalted by faith. Then 
great a division here and everywhere between longing tor wor- 
ship and real activity in religious investigation; there is a lack of 
intellectual vividness in religious life. 

The bond which holds us till together, here tit \\ ellcslev. is not 

the "college life," not education or "practical efficiency," but 
the real quest for truth. The tone of the whole college should 
be affected and created by it ; it should be the supreme thing in 
the college. 

Our common ground here is to be found ill our common pur- 
pose, therefore our object here in a religious Way ought to be to 
transfigure the intellectual life int.. the highest and holiest of 



oppo 



ortunities; we should be always seeki 



the relation of our 



religiou life to our life of thought, reacting toward one great 
unit v 
Good work is not tm end in itself; if isti means to apprehension 

of truth and discipline of nature We are here to think, to de- 
velope in these four \ ears our inner life, the life oi thought must 
fkmrtshand minds dcvclope the power of loving O0.1. before we 
can apprehend 1 he laws oi His infinite mind, and think His 
thoughts after Him, and each can apprehend the vision ac- 
cording to her talents. We must go forth in the high serious- 
ness ol the passion for truth, with clarity oi vision, balance of 
mind, and penetrating insight, that the spirit of truth may re- 
veal himself and lead us onward, until perhaps We may know 
thai highest joy, thai purifying absolution that comes from ex- 
periencing the intellectual love of truth. 



COL L/E G E :■' B W S 



MR. WHITTEMORE'S READING. 



Tufts College gavi 
March ta The ei 

how much Mr. Wl 
enjoyed The reai 
heard Profes: !o 



nluding Ai 



feasor Hart, Profi wot Whitternore of 
ling from Kipling in B 
1 1. applau le oi I hi audii 
e' .. mpathi tii i" ! ' rpn 11 tl 
. , pei i. ,ii- inten iting to 
ii \\ elle lie . a J ''-' ' •'"" ' 
irel) diff erenl •■ a thai il 

,li hi Wliii 1 1 in 

ill- I'mi peland pn 

mi i tall ' hi K ipling as a writi 

ll,i i . i i He read vith a vigor and 

nun, ' i r ii, t.i i, iding did no1 make 
, All the elei tion i on Thur da) 
le i il K ipling and the inti i . ■ 
jei tivi I'n, i,- ssor Wlm temore u, - 
,ii i he i arious aspects of Kipling's 
ranged from the old favoriti Tom 
published, "To the Survivors of the 
can as well as English and Indian 



After the reading, Professor Whitternore con ented to read 

"The Hound (if Heaven" l(> llmse remaining. In reading tin-. 

beautiful and difficult poem, Mr. Whitternore showed more Mian 
in anything else the sympathy in his voice and hi tri 
fine appreciation. 

The Annual Reports of the College Settlements 
Association. 



This week, the annual reports of the College Settlements As- 
sociation have been distributed more or less throughout the col- 
lege, especially to members of the Association. We have no1 
been doing this for a pastime, but because we want every mem- 
ber to realize to what she pays her dues every year, and what 
thai money is accomplishing. It is not brought out in popular 
form with colored photographs and graphic illustrations, but it 
is interesting reading, nevertheless. The reports from the va- 
rious sub-chapters in the colleges show what special work they 
have done this past year and arc cspc. lallv valuable in furnish- 
ing suggestions to us for new departures and better methods of 
work. Following these, are the rather detailed reports from 
the head workers of the three settlements, which we help sup- 
port. Miss Williams' report is full of enthusiasm and new plans 
of the gymnasium, for which thev have been working so long, 
while Miss Davis, in a delightfully refreshing and clever paper, 
tells of her struggles with the "ways of darkness" in Philadel- 
phia. Probably the most interesting pari of the Denison House 
report, for Weilesley students, is Miss Scudder's contribution 
on her work with the Italians, many of whom we entertained 
here last Decoration Day. - 

Don't throw these reports into your waste baskets without 
reading them! Take a few moments and dip into them, and 
I'm sure you'll read more. R. C, '08. 

The Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, 
New York. 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF SCHOLARSHIPS AND 
FELLOWSHIPS. 

The Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research purposes to 
award for the year igoS-igoq a limited number of scholarships 
and fellowships for work to be carried on in the laboratories of 
the Institute in Xew York City, under the following conditions: 

The scholarships and fellowships will be granted to assist in- 
vestigations in experimental pathology, bacteriology, medical 
zoology, physiology and pharmacology, physiological" and patho- 
logical chemistry and experimental surgery. 

They are open to men and women who are properly qualified 
to undertake research work in any of the above mentioned sub- 
jects and are granted for one year. 

The value of these scholarships and fellowships ranges from 
eight hundred to twelve hundred dollars each. 

It is expected that holders of the scholarships and fellowships 
will devote their entire time to research. 

Applications accompanied by proper credentials should be in 
the hands of the Secretary of The Rockefeller Institute not later 
than April ist. iqoS. The announcement of the appointments 
is made about May 15th. The term of service begins preferably 
on October 1st. but, by special arrangement may be begun at 
another time. 

L. EMMETT HOLT. M. D., Secretary, 
14 West 55th street. Xew York City. 



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Schools and Colleges. Special designs and 

estimates free on request. 

COLLEGE AND SCHOOL EMBLEMS. 
An illustrated catalogue showing newest designs In 
high-grade College and Fraternity Pins. Medals. Rings. 
Fobs and Novelties, mailed free on request. 



1218-20-22 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia 

Women's Nobby Styles in Sample Footwear. 

Also all styles of leather to select from in street boots and 
Oxfords 

We save you S1.00 to $2.50 per pair. 

Two Stores: 74 Bovlston St., up one flight, cor. Tremont. 
493 Wash. St., up one flight, cor. Temple PI. 

THE SAMPLE SHOE SHOP COMPAffl 

We sold 0,000 pairs of sample shoes to College Girls last season. 
Why? 

Newest designs in evening slippers. 

COLLINS & FAIRBANKS CO. 
MILLINERY 

Spring Opening of Young Ladies' Hats, 
Exclusive in style, moderate in price. 

383 Washington St., directly opposite franklin St.. Boston 



SOCIETY NOTES. 



A meeting of S 
ing. March 11. iqoS. The foil a . 

membership: Gertrude Gladding. c$. "Rebekah Da v: 1 
Gertrude Cook. '10. K.v 
Mapes, '10. Louise Whitali 

At a meeting of the S '- - - 

ing. March 2. 100S. Agnes Gilson 
bership. 

A regular meeting of the Shal 
urday evening. March 14. at th< S 
lowing program was given: 

Macbeth. 
3 

First Witch 

Second Witch 

Third Witch 

III. 
First Witch ... 

Second Witch 

Third Witch 

Macbeth. . . 

Banquo 

S ne IV. 
Lady Macbeth 

Macbeth Chari 

S 
Porter. . 



COLLEG E N i ; . W S 



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G RACE'S, 

] I Summer Street, near Washington 
BOSTON 



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DHfSS SUII CASfS, IHAVtllNG BAGS, 

TRUNKS, 

Made and Repaired. 

Pocket Books & Fancy Leather Goodi 

657 Atlantic Ave.. 

Opp. Booth Station. 

John A. Morgan & Co. 
PHARMACISTS, 

Shottuck Building, 
WELLESLEY. 



Chiropodist 



Scalp Treatment a Specialty. 



ENE BLIS5ARD, 

"The Noma," Welltsley Squrr. 

TAILBY, 

THE WELLESLEY FLORIST. 



Orders by Mail or Otherwise are 

Given Prompt Attention. 

J. TAILBY & SON, Proprietors, 

WtllfSlfY, MASS. 

TELEPHONE 340-4 

WELLESLEY TOILET PARLORS. 

Shampooing, facial Treatment. 

Scalp Treatment, Manicuring, 

Hair Dressing, Chiropody. 

TAYLOR BLOCK, Rooms 4 & 5, WELLESLEY 



F. D1EHL, JR. 

Boarding and Livery 

STABLE, 

WELLESLEY, MASS. 



M. G. SHAW, 

Watchmaker and Optician, 

Agent for the Provident Life 

and Trust Co. 
Wellesley, - JVlass. 

Utopian Chocolates, 
Souvenir Cards, 

Waterman Pens, 

Sexton's Pharmacy, 

WELLESLEY SQUARE. 




PARLIAMENT OF POOLS. 



)oWNE.V$ Chocolates 

ONE BOX WILL MAKE A HAPPY GIRL 
RETAIL STORE, 416 Washington Street 

The Walnut Hill School, 



ECHOES PROM MIDYEARS. 
< > 1 ■ 1 English poetry is ina.lt- up of rum 
Beowulf in his fight with the dragon ■ Wiclif. 

Mai beth showed his weakness in having t tic- murderers kill 
Banquo instead of himself. 
Chaucer, in hi desi ription of the prioress, is clear but com- 

I'lini.'iu.cM. fli- i not Mineral i ,v 

Bede was the author of a familiar work known as I 
And angle appeared to him in a vision and bade him sing. 

An elegy is a poem of mourning. A hero is usually I 
feature, 

Wiclif was the father of argumentation. 

Crammer was the author of the prayer-book — a charming and 
dignified piece of literature. 

Panope is the Goddess of music. 

Shakespeare always gave his women the best rolls. 



POLLY: A GEOMETRICAL ROMANCE. 
There once was a lad and also a lass 
Both in the same geometry class. 
He was very acute, that's so, 
She was similar, that I know. 
Although for him she had never angled. 
Yet on the end of her line he dangled. 
One eve, While walking around the square, 
"You haven't a parallel," he did declare; 
"Von are far from being plain (plane) in the face, 
There is nothing about you anyway base." 
"You compliment (complement) me," she did reply. 
Saying these words with a long low sigh (loci). 
Then this bold youth, because 'twas dark, 
With his arm around her, described an arc. 
But she drew away with a haughty tread; 
"This is approaching the limit," she said. 
Thus from him forever was his Polly gone (polygon). 
From this a conclusion must surely be drawn, 
A moral we all should ponder upon. i 



THEATER NOTES. 



Tremont: "The Man of the Hour." 

Hollis-street: Maud Adams in "The Jesters 

Majestic: "The Gay White Way." 

Park: "The Chorus Lady." 

Colonial: Olgo Nethersole in Repertoire. 




The Grandest Place in New England 
To Spend a Winter Vacation 

THE WHITE MOUNTAINS 

Of NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Unlimited Possibilities for All Kinds of 

WINTER SPORTS 

Excellent Train Service — Low Rates — Grand Scenery 

For Information regarding hotels, address Passenger department 

j. BOSTON & MAINE RAILROAD, BOSTON 

S^ C. n. BURT, den. Pass. Agt. y^ 



Natick, Mass. 
A College Preparatory School for Girls 

Miss ( on., m! and Miss Bigelow, 

Prindpab. 

HOLDEIYS STUDIO, 

20 North Ave , Natick, 

High Grade Portraits 

Connected by Telephone. 



Pianos for Rent. 

SPECIALTY: A small piano with 
a big tone. This piano is used 
extensively by Yale students. 

DERBY'S PIANO ROOMS, 

Clark's Block, - - Natick 



C. M. McKechnie G. F. McKenney 

C M. McKechnie & Co. 

BAKERS AND CATERERS 

Telephone s-4 
io Main Street, Natick, Mass. 



The Wellesley Grocery Co. 

Montague Block, 
WELLESLEY - MASS. 



SMITH BROTHERS, 

Butter, Cheese and Eggs, 

2 and 4 New faneuil Hall Market, 



BOSTON 



TURNER CENTER DAIRYING 
ASSOCIATION,^* 

33 fulton Streel, Cor. Cross, 

BOSTON 

Telephone, 207 Richmond. 



Cafedes 
Invalides 



COLLEGE NEWS 



COOK'S Restaurant 

88 BOYLSTON STREET 

Next to Colonial Thenter 

Matinee Lunches 

The Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume. 

COTRELL & LEONARD, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 
Makers of th© 

Caps, Gowns and Hoods 

to Wellesley, Radcliffe, Mount Holyoke, P.ryn 
Mawr, Barnard, Woman's College of Baltimore, 
Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Cornell, Univ. of Fa., Dartmouth, Brown, 
Williams, Amljerst, Colorado College, Stanford and the others. 

CORRECT HOODS FOR ALL DEGREES. 

Illustrated bulletin and samples on request. 



m 



FREE PRESS. 



Again societies. The strong; articles by Miss Cooper and Miss 
Morrill bring out clearly the fact that the non-society as well as 
the society girl has privileges, — the difference lying in the 
recognition of the privileges, one having unrecognized while the 
other has recognized privileges. Now can a girl with unrecog- 
nized privileges who, as Miss Morrill's article says, "makes her 
freedom and her pain serve her. and so is stronger than the 
societ) girl for her strength is in and of herself" — can that girl 
be as happy; as broad-minded ("in and of herself") as the 
societ} girl? can she get as much out of college social life as the 
society girl? I think not. 

And after college days are over the girl with unrecognized 
strength, unrecognized privileges returns to class reunions, or 
visits tin- college during the year. Do any undergraduates 
take special care to make her visit to her college happy and 
pleasant ? Is she invited to participate in any merry-makings 
other than class dinners, class cheering, and en masse affairs 
which <}o not tend to bring out her hidden strength 3 

The writer wishes this strength of the non-society girl to be 
recognized and would venture to make a suggestion in that line. 
(in page 332 of the Outlook for February S, is an article. "A 
non-fraternity Federation." Let me quote a few lines — "The 
increasing cxpciisiveness and exclusiveness of college fraterni- 
ties had led to a large group of non-fraternity men. Without 
adequate representation, possessed of scanty social advantages. 
lacking that stimulus toward the highest development which 
membership in a good college society affords, and without any 
permanent tics to any portion of the undergraduate body after 
graduation, many of this number dropped out of college, while 
those who remained secured a one-sided development. It was to 
till this need of the non-fraternity element that these neutral 
organizations were established." 

Would it be possible to have some such organization at 
Welleslej Could the Bamswallows be developed in that line? 
The writer suggests that the requirements for membership be 
the same as at present — every student eligible: that the society 
of Bamswallows adopt some emblem, as a pin, to be worn by 
those members having diploma grade: that a fund be started to 
which the different classes, societies, and outsiders may con- 
tribute- a fund for a Rarnswallow building having the ad- 
vantages of the present society houses but built on a larger 
scale, In' such" .a building any girl might have the privilege of 
entertaining her college friends in a way that is impossible in a 
girl's ,.\\n' room. Perhaps such a building would be beneficial 
to enforcement of the quiet rules of student government in the 



Lvcry Rflquld tt; for ;i 

SDaintg Xuncfo 

AT 

COBB, BATES & YKKXA CO., 

55 to 6 J Summer Street, 
(Only one block from '•'. 

KANRICH'S ORCHESTRA 

The very best musicians for Dances. Theatrical*. Receptions 
etc., etc. Orchestration. 



AbBERT M. KANRICH, 



Tel. Oxford 1078-3 



I64A TfOmont St.. F-.....1 



dormitories. In such a building a girl could ente" 

friends (with certain restrictions, of course). And when she 

returned to Alma Mater after college days were over she has a 

place where she may meet her friends and acquaint^' 

live over again the social joys of college life. 

This is but a crude suggestion and may be altered 
larged upon to the benefit of all concerned, 
criticize, or else alter and enlarge? An .'•. 

II. 

May I pick up the idea of Free Press to further urge the accom- 
plishment of social graces not only as a 

in Bridge, but as an acknowledged adjunct of the process ■ 
college life? 

"A beautiful voice, beautiful movements, and eve- 
care for the body" is Greek in its spirit, than which we have 
attained nothing higher, intellectual; 
the college girl's ideal almost ignores the 
moving and having her being. Is not the master- 
intellect without its proper complement, unless she buil 
trained mind a temple of refinement and grace as an op- 
pression of the inner truth and beaut v" 

Is there swifter and surer means of winning 
sisters to higher interests than to step from the t % - 
Alma Mater " finished " socially as well as intelle 

Is not the union of these ideals worthy and possible, an 
the college girl falling short of the fulfillment of her otvh person- 
ality, and of her grasp upon the fullness of life, unless she has 
this dual j ■■■ 

Should the college girl be last or even second to shoulder the 
burden of reforming the American misuse of tl 
versation? Can the college girl as a teacher or speaker 
to come, afford to be without the power of an a" - - 
and a voice cultivated to be heard without straii 
pitch? Does not the college girl owe sc 
the peculiarly feminine charms are n I 
riehed and ennobled by companion 
power, and by service in the realm of higl 

E. C. G. A Moderate Bridge Pl 

III. 

Spring elections are almost upon us. .' 
them may not be superfluous. 

Let us be sincere in our attitude tov 
Vote for a girl because you belit 
best girl for the position. Don't let th« 
interfere with your own truest judgment 
because she comes from your own freshi 
your floor, or belongs to your society 
than vote in such a manner, un1 
girl voting with absolir - 

to herself." her class and her college, will help ". 
vote to give the college a most splen ii i : r - 

My apology for this w- 
surfaee. is an' unpleasant rumor 
elections that have beer. 
It is too serious to be overlooked. Let us! 
conduct to politicians, and let US - 
be women'f reef rem taint. 



COL I- B G E N E w S 



For a HYGIENIC TREATMENT 

,1 iln- Iiaii .m.l scalp, ..i fur a good .liainpun, mi facial treatment, 
try Madam Gilli 

Y..11 will it . > t only get first-class work, but will find quietness, 
privacy and refinement. 

It costs no more than you would pay for first-class work any- 
where. Send for circular on care of the hair. 

MADAM GILLESPIE, 

The Copley. 18 Huntington Ave. 

The Women's Shoe Shop, 

MISS H. H. MURPHY. 

501 Washington St., near \\cs(, BOSTON. 
Highest Grade, lowest Prices. Arch Support Boots a Specialty. 

Telephone 28H-1 Oxford. Elevator. Room 31. 



for New York 

i the staff of Gi 



ALUMN/E NOTES. 

In addition to notes concerning graduates, the Alumnae Col- 
umn will contain items of interest about members of the Faculty, 
past and present, and former students. 

The following notice of the ordination to the diaconate of Mr 
| Higginson Cabol . Ph. D., of Boston, is taken from the Boston 
Herald of March g "At aspecial service at the churchof the 
Advent yesterday morning, in the presence of his family and one 
of the largest attendances the- church has held for many months, 
the Rev. J. Higginson Cabot, Ph. D., of Boston, was ordained 
to the diaconate by the R-t. Rev. Dr. R. H. Weller, bishop 
coadjutor of Fond du Lac. Dr. Cabot is one of the youngest 
men in the ministry. He graduated En im Harvard College in the 
Class of moo and then went to Europe, where he spent two 
years studying European history in Paris and Berlin. He re- 
turned to Boston and entered the graduate school a1 Hi rvard 
where he taught history under Professor A C. Coolidge. In 
mo4 he took his degree in philosophy, writing his thesis on 'The 
Union of ftaly.' Since thai time he has been teaching history 
at Wellesley College. Dr. Cabot will U 
week's time and will spend his diacona 
Church, in the East Side, in the heart of 

Miss Mary Jelfeis, who was a1 Wellesley during part of the 
year 1885, took her degrees of A. B and A. M.,in c 895 and 1897 
i'mm Bryn Mawr, and later studied at the universities of Munich, 
Halle and Brown, She is now engaged in preparing girls for 
college, especially for Bryn Mawr and in public lecturing. 

A ng the subjects she offers arc travel-talks on Germany, 

Scotland, Switzerland, and lectures on the cities of Italy, ancient 
and modern. 

Miss Susan 1> Huntington, moo, has accepted for the re- 

uder of the year the position of critic teacher in the seventh 

an d eighth grades in the Normal school, St. Cloud, Minnesota. 

Mi Cora Jefferson Hogan, 1905, is assistant in the Missouri 
Botanical Garden Library at St Louis, and may be addressed 
,,1 1 16 ; Botanical avenue, Si Louis, Missouri 

Mrs 11 Takeda (Kin Kato, 1888-89) is teaching in the Girls' 
I figher Normal School, Tokyo, Japan. 

Miss Grao Edgett, [897, is substitute teacher of Mathematics 
in Mrs. Keep's School, Farmington, Connecticut. 

Miss Alice Perry, [907, with her family is travelling in Europe. 

CHANGES OF ADDRESS. 
Mrs. George Miller (Georgiella Middleton, 189] 92), Bound 
Brook, \ I 

Miss [eanette Trowbridge. 1893-95, South Framingham. 

Ma s 
Miss Mary C Bliss, 1899, 210 So 37th St., Philadelphia, Penri. 

ENGAGEMENT. 
Miss Ruth Haulenbecl . 1905, to Mr Arthur Wall. ridge North, 
Universit y of California 1 

DEATHS. 

March 7. m,>s. in Arlington, Massachusetts, Clement March. 
father ol Bi 1 tha Man h, 1 89 

March 11 1908, in Boston, Massachusetts, Elisabeth Bailey 
Hardee, 1894, and Sarah Chamberlain Weed, 1895. 

March 8, 1908, in San Antonio, Texas, Mrs. |ohn (',. Mulhol- 

land (Cora Ready, t88o-8?\ 



COURSES ON FINANCE 

1 . Elementary Courses for students who sometimes may 
be obliged to make investments or handle trust lun.K. 

2. Advanced Courses for students who desire to prepare 
as Statisticians! librarians or clerks for banking houses. 

Financial and Economic Books of All Countries. 

k'OGER W. BABSON, 

Care of the Bankers' Educational Bureau, 
SPRAGUE BU1LDINC. WELLESLEY HILLS, MASS. 

Wf nt i»« (onjiliit ililnlitv (or inilr 10 lh> Uii'il Burnt iltim n Ik UM Stitn ad In* 
iti will tUdly li.f irltmm it itutri 



MUSIC NOTES. 



The First Lenten Organ Recital was held at Memorial Chapel 
on Wednesday, March ti, 1908, at 4-2° P.M. Professor Henry 

Dike Sleeper of Smith College was the organist. 
PROGRAMME. 

1 Si I 1 1 in F minor Sleeper 

Prelude and Hymn 
Cantabile 

Intermezzo 
Finale 

2 lAxT.uiit.i Cesar Pranck 

Reverie in E flat Lemare 

Pastorale in F (Part 1) Bach 

5. Andante Cantabile from the string quartette. .Tchaikowsky 

4. Improvisation 

5. Sanctus from the St. Cecilia Mass Gounod 

A tea for Mr. Sleeper was given after the Recital at the T 

Z. E. House 

The Second Supplementary Recital was held at College Hall 
Chapel, Monday. March id. 1908, at 7 30 P.M. 

Mr. Arnold Dolmetsch, Harpsichord, Clavichord, and Viola 
d'Amore. 

Mrs. Arnold Dolmetsch. Viola da Gamba. 

Mr. C W. Adams, Harpsichord. 

Programme. 

1 Suite of four pieces for t WO viols and t he harpsichord. 
1 Almain. II. Corant ... .William La We- 
ill. Saraband [V. Jigg 

2. Harpsichord I'ie.es by French Composers 

I. Soeur Monique, Rondo Francois Couperin, 172 

II LeCoucou Claude Daquin, 1735 

HI Le^ippd des Oiseau* }--J- P. Rameau, 1721 

For the Viola da C.amba Marin Marais, [68 

4. Pieces for the Clavichord 

I. Prelude No XII in F minor, ,744 ) „ „ L 

11 Prelude and Fugue No t in C major. 1722 H.S.Bach 
111 PreludeNo. XXI in B flat major. 1722 J 

5 Sonata for the Viola d'Amore \ttilio Anostt. 1715 

(. Harpsichord Pieces by German and Italian Composers 

1. Passacaille.. G. F. Handel, 1720 

II Sonata in D major Dorhenico Scarlatti, c 17-^ 

111 Gigue from Partita in B flat \ | s; n ,eh 

Toccata in G major I J ' 

Three Pieces from the Second Concert for Harpsichord. 
Viola d'Amore and Viola da C.amba. 

I. La Boucoi) 

11 L'Agacante J- P. Rameau, ,74. 

111. DeuxMenuets 

The Second Lenten Organ Recital was held 011 Wednesday, 
March iS. [908, at I 20 P M 

Mr, Joseph \ Ashton, Organist 
programme. 

I Absoute (Absolution) Vivet 

Elevation in E flat Rousseau 

II Prelude and Fugue in C major Bach 

Sun 1 wo .' Bach 

Mini i i in B minor Gigout 

Concert Piece in H major Parker 

The next recital in this series will be bv Mr William Churchill 

Hammond of Mount Hblyoke College, Wednesday, March 25 p.t 

4.20. in the Memorial Chapel. 



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